Cove Creek Falls & The Surprisingly Beautiful Set of Cascades Along The Way

January 1, 2017, another New Year upon us and another opportunity for some memorable New Years Hikes.  Following the trend of the past few years, I set out for some “new to me” falls. There is no better place to look for new falls than on the “Carolina Mountain Club’s Waterfall Challenge 100” list that I am getting into the latter stages of.  I set out to find waterfall #78 of the 100, and Cove Creek Falls became the destination of#78.  Most of the ones left on the list for me to explore are in this area or the Great Smokies.  Finding it only required a little research into the 2 best resources for North Carolina Waterfalls….1)North Carolina Waterfalls Third Edition by Kevin Adams, and 2)www.northcarolinawaterfalls.com website by Rich Stevenson.  If one is unable  find the information for the  waterfall they seeketh on one of these two resources, chances are  the waterfall is either on private property, or doesn’t exist.   Continue reading “Cove Creek Falls & The Surprisingly Beautiful Set of Cascades Along The Way”

The Narrows of Eastatoe Creek

The Narrows of Eastatoe Creek is one of the waterfalls on the Carolina Mountain Club’s Waterfall Challenge 100 that I have been working, off and on to achieve the last several years.  This particular hike was a longer one at 5 miles round trip.  The majority of the hike is on a relatively (a few ups and downs)  flat forest road with just the  last section descending into the gorge and creek way, way below.  It cuts down the very steep mountainside through a series of switchbacks and well placed stairs.  It was nowhere close to being as strenuous as I had imagined it being.  At the end is a beautiful, elevated viewing deck with an unobstructed, although distant view of the very unique waterfall formation known as “The Narrows”.   Continue reading “The Narrows of Eastatoe Creek”

Sweet Thing and Last Falls on Slickum Creek

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As I planned my last waterfall hike of 2016, I first chose the big one.  It came down between Pinnacle Falls and The Narrows on Eastatoe Creek, both in upstate SC along US 178.  I usually like to make a  full day so picked a few smaller, easy ones as well.  I planned to find and visit a small, delicate beauty known as Sweet Thing.  This one is a small 20 footer on Slickum Creek located just upstream from its crossing of  SC Highway 11.  Anyone that has visited the very popular Wildcat Wayside waterfall that is right along side the highway should also visit Sweet Thing.  I was quite surprised at how close the two were. Continue reading “Sweet Thing and Last Falls on Slickum Creek”

Upper Creek Falls – 2016’s Best Autumn Waterfall

Upper Creek Falls

My best fall outing in 2016 came on October 20.  The season had been a let down for the most part due to the extremely warm and dry conditions most of the summer and fall.  I had an aggressive plan this year primarily based on the dates of some of my favorite photos from years past.  This…..was a strategical error on my part.  October 1 came with primarily green dominated landscapes.  Finally on the second half of October, color began to really pour in.  On Thursday 10/20, weather was an issue as it was to be the last day of temps in the 70s before the first real cool blast came in, dropping temps into the 40’s in the mountains for that Friday and Saturday.  I chose Upper Creek Falls, because, well most others didn’t.  I would also need to ride along the Blue Ridge Parkway, through the Linn Cove Viaduct  to get there.  After 2 failed attempts t see color in the Grandfather area of the Blue Ridge Parkway, maybe this day would be better.   Continue reading “Upper Creek Falls – 2016’s Best Autumn Waterfall”

Upper Sols Creek Falls

2016 has been the year of Kevin Adams,  here in our NC Mountains!  He has released a new, much anticipated and updated edition of his iconic “North Carolina Waterfalls” book.  He has spent a good part of his summer making appearances at various western NC locations promoting his book and giving his waterfall and photography presentation.  He has made waterfallers out of many of us common folks who once upon a time, had absolutely no clue of what  wonderful treasures our hills were hiding. So in October .. when Kevin came out with a post on his North Carolina Waterfall Facebook page that listed the 11 top waterfalls for Autumn photography, I read with great interest.  Number one on his list was Upper Sols Creek Falls. This is one that I had not previously visited.   I had already seen some wonderful photos of this by some fellow waterfallers, and with the beginning of autumn here upon us, I headed out to see this one for myself.

This one seems like it would be easy enough to find. The general location is along NC Highway 281, several miles south of Tuckaseegee at the 281 / 107 split.   It is described to park just up the road from where NC 281 crosses Sols Creek.  The first problem I ran into, was finding Sols Creek.  I kept looking for a bridge to cross Sols Creek.  I finally found the spot where it “should be” on the cell phone map and parked for a closer inspection.  The way NC highway 281 is developed through here,  there is very little indication that there is even a creek here.  Only by stopping, checking GPS, and backtracking to where the road dipped to its lowest point before climbing back uphill, was I able to locate Sols Creek.

I parked up the road a bit at what was a wide pull out on NC 281.  I walked back to where the highway crossed Sols Creek. They have constructed it nicely, channeling the creek under the highway through pipes instead of a more obvious bridge.  The trees are so thick heading upstream that the creek can not be seen from a car view.  There is a gated road looking upstream on the left with No Trespassing signs.  I was like “Uh-Oh”. However, I trusted what books and my other resources said….that the Creek and Falls were on national forest property.  I avoided the road and crossed the guardrail into the woods,  bushwhacking my way down to Sols Creek. The vegetation was thick at first, but I was able to pick up a faint trail and followed it.  A creek crossing came soon where the remains of an old bridge and road remain.  The forest has done an excellent job of reclaiming this land.  The large concrete structures are all that give it away.   From here it is simply 1/2 mile up the creek, not a simple hike though.    The trail will cross many times here.  Keeping your feet dry is simply not an option.  This is where my Keen water shoes came in very handy.  For those with little creek walking experience, this is a good stretch for Creek Walking 101.  It’s fairly safe, and much easier than trying to keep your feet dry.  

There will be a section or two where a trail picks back up, then back to creek walking.  You may even see the remains of a bridge, which just shows the power this water has when it gets high.  Once the creekbed turns to bedrock and starts climbing, the water gets noisier and Upper Sols Falls is near.  Just a little further and there it was:

It was a beautiful waterfall, just nowhere close to optimal photo conditions though. Most of the shots here all came from a cell phone.  The sun was too bright and the shadows were too harsh when trying to capture the whole scene.  I climbed on the rocks some to get some closer shots and get the sun only shots, but just wasn’t the day.   The leaves on the trees hadn’t even begun to change even though is was the 1st weekend in October.

This is a good hike to either have some water shoes, or wear some that you don’t care to get wet.  Once that issue is taken care of, it’s a pretty easy, short hike.  I found it to be about 3/4 mile one way from where I had the car parked on NC 281.  This would be a nice hike to go along with some other waterfalls closely including Paradise Falls, many of those in Panthertown Valley to make a nice day trip out of it.

Dingmans Falls

imageI recently made a change to my job that allows for some periodic traveling. One of the huge benefits to this has been the opportunity to see waterfalls outside of my home region.  My recent trip over the last week in August took me to New Jersey.  The first thing that comes to most people’s mind when they hear New Jersey isn’t ….Waterfalls.   Continue reading “Dingmans Falls”

King Creek Falls – Winter 2016

King Creek Falls was the main waterfall I was here to see on this late February afternoon.  I made a full day of it though, stopping along the way at White Owl Falls, and Spoonauger Falls.  Both Falls had impressive waterflows.  It was a dreary, cloudy day.  It had all the makings of an epic waterfall journey.  After visiting Spoonager Falls for the first time, it was a short ride back up Burrells Ford Rd to the parking area for King Creek Falls.   After the unexpected trees and fallen Rhodo that made the last 0.1 mile of Spoonauger Falls much more challenging, I was wondering what this 0.9 mile trek had in store for me.  My answer came sooner than expected.  There was a large truck parked near me with 2 older gentleman.  They had been along the trail maintaining it and were putting chainsaws away.  This was an interesting sign.  I had a quick chat with them and they mentioned that it was pretty passable.  After hiking it, I was so, so thankful for their efforts. The first half of this trail would have been much more difficult without them.   
Those Pine trees just don’t seem to hold up well to late winter, early spring storms.  There was much more downfall on this trail than the one on Spoonauger just down the road.  The main difference, the trail maintainers had already been here.  There had also been some fresh trail sign painting, marking the Foothills Trail and King Creek Trail.

After the bridge crosses King Creek, this was where my luck ran out.  There were still some fallen rhodos to work my way up and over, under, in and around.  The trail was so narrow here, rising quickly on one side, and dropping steeply on the other.  I had no choice but to work through it, camera gear and all.  I made my way on to King Creek Falls and it was impressive.  Gone was the half sun half shade of the first visit.  I had a much better waterflow, and I had it all to myself.  

The best views require crossing the creek, which was somewhat tricky  in higher water.  The tree crossing it was not as sturdy as I remember it though.  I have a feeling the rotting tree will be gone some day and this will be a wet crossing.  That would be ok, it’s worth it!  Here is a short video of King Creek Falls:

Spoonauger Falls

I first visited Spoonauger Falls in late February 2016.  It was an overcast day, with lots of rain falling in the days prior to my hike.  I was in this area to make a return visit to King Creek Falls.  My 1st visit was over 2 years ago, and I wanted to return under better conditions than what a typical hot and dry late August afternoon can provide.  Before I did this though, my first stop was to a waterfall that I overlooked on my first visit.  Once I learned how close I was to Spoonauger Falls, and that I didn’t check it out….I could have kicked myself.  That’s ok, I made it on this day and it was a beauty!  

White Owl Falls

From NC, I came down NC 281 and crossed into South Carolina where the highway changes to SC 130.  On the way down, I passed right by Whte Owl Falls on the Thompson River and had a feeling it would looking good.  I was soooo not wrong.  I even took a side path to view it from the top, it was ok, no where near as good as the view from the base.  It was gonna be a good day.  I got back on the road, into SC, and took the sign “To 107”.  I turned left to head south for a few miles and took a right on Burrels Ford Road.  To get to Spoonauger Falls, meant driving past the King Creek Falls parking area for a short ways.  I initially passed right by it , crossed the bridge over the Chatooga River, and boom, I was in Georgia.  Georgia wasn’t even on my mine…but Spoonaguer is right at the Chatooga which happens to be the northern border between these two states.  

I pulled into this parking lot above, turned around as parked just off the road where the access was to the Chatooga Trail.  This waterfall starts off with an easy hike along the Chatooga River upstream from the road.  After a crossing of Spoonauger Creek, the trail for Spoonauger Falls heads right or upstream.  

As you can see by the sign, it is a short 0.1 miles upstream.  It was difficult on this day in February anyway.  A number of large Rhododendrons , much taller than my 6 foot frame had toppled over and were covering the narrow, wet and muddy trail.  I slowly worked my way over and under and around the storm-fallen plants and was treated to a beautiful 50 foot waterfall. 

I was able to make it out into the middle and down a few tiers for an exceptional view.  I’m not sure what I was expecting to see at Spoonauger Falls but it wasn’t this.  I was very pleased.  I made it back to the car, then it was off to King Creek.  

Here is a short video of Spoonauger Falls:

Mabry Mill On A Summer Day

It was a family Sunday in early July.  One of Kristin’s favorite areas in the Blue Ridge Mountains is in southern Virginia.  Following the Blue Ridge Parkway from the Fancy Gap area to some attractions near Meadows of Dan, Va always makes a nice half day trip.  It’s a short drive for us, and a quick way to escape a 93 degree hot & humid day in exchange for a nice 78 degree day with a nice breeze.  After a nice lunch at the Groundhog Mountain picnic area, we made the short ride north on the Blue Ridge Parkway to Mabry Mill at milepost 176

Mabry Mill is a beautifully restored and preserved working mill right off the Parkway.  It is certainly one of the BRP’s top attractions.  It has a nice restaurant and gift shop, that among other typical parkway souvenirs,sells stone ground cornmeal, grits and buckwheat flour all ground at the mill.  The whole area is very picturesque.  Some very iconic photos have been made here with the beautiful small pond, and mill combination. The best photos here seem to come in the fall.  It’s a nice place to visit in summer as well.  Come on a weekend day, they may have the mill open for touring.  Expect crowds though,  this place is popular. For more info on the beautiful Mabry Mill, please click here. 

Blackwater Falls


I’ve wanted to visit Blackwater Falls….for years now.  The problem is that it has always been “just out of reach”. I reside in central NC, and I make trips into central and southern West Virginia several times a year.  Northern West Virginia doubles the 2 1/2 hour ride I normally set aside for West Virginia explorations.  The main reason I was headed to West Virginia in the first place was to find water.  Western NC, SC and eastern TN have been suffering abnormally dry starts to the summer of 2016, but not the Virginias.  Facebook photos of favorite NC waterfalls were displaying pitifully low waterflows, rendering rivers into trickling creeks.  On the Saturday of my departure, WV had just suffered 8-10 inches of rain in places two days prior, and there were reports of flooding in areas.   This was where I would find water.   Continue reading “Blackwater Falls”